AFI’s 100 Greatest Movies 

I’m back making my way through AFI’s 100 greatest movies. I only have 21 movies left before I can say that I’ve seen them all! 

All About Eve (1950)

There’s definitely a reason this was nominated for all the Oscars in 1951. This is a powerful drama about what people are willing to do to get to the top. You hear the stories of people stepping on others to get to their dreams, and this is a perfectly crafted character study on an actress the world she manipulates. It’s got some amazing performances and is just as emotionally relevant today as when it came out. It’s on netflix streaming, so if you’ve passed it before, it’s time to check it out.  

My review of Oculus starring Karen Gillan! 

These people have obviously never watched an episode of Are You Afraid of the Dark

thelandofcinema:

One of the best lines in movie history
thelandofcinema:

One of the best lines in movie history

thelandofcinema:

One of the best lines in movie history

hermione:


How do you shoot the devil in the back? What if you miss?

The Usual Suspects (1995), dir. Bryan Singer
hermione:


How do you shoot the devil in the back? What if you miss?

The Usual Suspects (1995), dir. Bryan Singer
hermione:


How do you shoot the devil in the back? What if you miss?

The Usual Suspects (1995), dir. Bryan Singer
hermione:


How do you shoot the devil in the back? What if you miss?

The Usual Suspects (1995), dir. Bryan Singer
hermione:


How do you shoot the devil in the back? What if you miss?

The Usual Suspects (1995), dir. Bryan Singer

hermione:

How do you shoot the devil in the back? What if you miss?

The Usual Suspects (1995), dir. Bryan Singer


This scene originally was to be played as a very serious scene, however the actors kept cracking up with Benicio del Toro (as Fred Fenster) flubbing his lines. It eventualy became a constant laugh fest amongst the actors (leading Director Bryan Singer’s constant anger with the scene). But after reviewing the dailies, Singer realized that it actually played better into the character’s profiles.

This scene originally was to be played as a very serious scene, however the actors kept cracking up with Benicio del Toro (as Fred Fenster) flubbing his lines. It eventualy became a constant laugh fest amongst the actors (leading Director Bryan Singer’s constant anger with the scene). But after reviewing the dailies, Singer realized that it actually played better into the character’s profiles.

This scene originally was to be played as a very serious scene, however the actors kept cracking up with Benicio del Toro (as Fred Fenster) flubbing his lines. It eventualy became a constant laugh fest amongst the actors (leading Director Bryan Singer’s constant anger with the scene). But after reviewing the dailies, Singer realized that it actually played better into the character’s profiles.

This scene originally was to be played as a very serious scene, however the actors kept cracking up with Benicio del Toro (as Fred Fenster) flubbing his lines. It eventualy became a constant laugh fest amongst the actors (leading Director Bryan Singer’s constant anger with the scene). But after reviewing the dailies, Singer realized that it actually played better into the character’s profiles.

This scene originally was to be played as a very serious scene, however the actors kept cracking up with Benicio del Toro (as Fred Fenster) flubbing his lines. It eventualy became a constant laugh fest amongst the actors (leading Director Bryan Singer’s constant anger with the scene). But after reviewing the dailies, Singer realized that it actually played better into the character’s profiles.

This scene originally was to be played as a very serious scene, however the actors kept cracking up with Benicio del Toro (as Fred Fenster) flubbing his lines. It eventualy became a constant laugh fest amongst the actors (leading Director Bryan Singer’s constant anger with the scene). But after reviewing the dailies, Singer realized that it actually played better into the character’s profiles.

This scene originally was to be played as a very serious scene, however the actors kept cracking up with Benicio del Toro (as Fred Fenster) flubbing his lines. It eventualy became a constant laugh fest amongst the actors (leading Director Bryan Singer’s constant anger with the scene). But after reviewing the dailies, Singer realized that it actually played better into the character’s profiles.

fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

Josh Pais who played Raphael suffers from claustrophobia. After filming Raphael’s scenes, he would have to take the helmet off very quickly.
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990)

fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

Josh Pais who played Raphael suffers from claustrophobia. After filming Raphael’s scenes, he would have to take the helmet off very quickly.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990)

my review of Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel 



Awful things happen in every apartment house.

Rosemary’s Baby (1968) | 31 Halloween Quintessential Classics


Awful things happen in every apartment house.

Rosemary’s Baby (1968) | 31 Halloween Quintessential Classics


Awful things happen in every apartment house.

Rosemary’s Baby (1968) | 31 Halloween Quintessential Classics


Awful things happen in every apartment house.

Rosemary’s Baby (1968) | 31 Halloween Quintessential Classics
Awful things happen in every apartment house.
Rosemary’s Baby (1968) | 31 Halloween Quintessential Classics
cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson cinematographic:

The Aviator - Thirds
Director: Martin Scorsese
Cinematography: Robert Richardson
superlockedanglerfishinthetardis:

hiddlestalker:

#basically every movie Martin Freeman is in

That’s it. Everyone go home. That’s the best tag ever.